East Asia

Pastor says he derived strength from having bible in North Korean camp

 

Reverend Hyeon Soo Lim from Mississauga, Ont. pastor who has been detained in North Korea, is shown in North Korea in a handout photo.

A Toronto pastor who was released from North Korea earlier this month has spoken out about his time in captivity for the first time.

Hyeong Soo Lim, 62, a Korean pastor based in Toronto, Canada has been released after two-and-a-half years in jail in North Korea, after he was arrested and handed a life sentence of hard labor for alleged crimes against the state.

The Christian pastor told CTV news that he derived strength from a copy of the Bible that was given to him during his isolation at the North Korean labor camp where he was held.

“Being alone and isolated was one of the hardest things about the punishment,” he told his congregation at the Light Korean Presbyterian Church in Mississauga, Ontario.

Lim, who spoke through his translator and family spokesperson Lisa Pak, added that he could survive only because of his faith and belief in God. “You fight to overcome the sense of loneliness.”

“They had isolated me from everybody else. So being separated from family, being alone for all of my meals, being away from human contact — that was one of the most difficult things.

“One of the core strengths for me was my relationship with God. So even while I was in hard labor, just consistently continually praying. And also the Bible that was provided to me, just havig that nearby was a real strength.”

The Canadian pastor who was born in South Korea also said he didn’t learn about his release on Aug. 9 until 15 minutes before, although he believed that one day he would be released.

As Reuters earlier reported, Lim was held for more than two years in North Korea after being sentenced to hard labor for life in December 2015, accused of attempting to overthrow Kim Jon Un’s regime.

Lim is the pastor of the 3,000-member Light Korean Presbyterian Church.

Although he was visiting North Korea for a humanitarian purpose, state prosecutors accused him of using the “false pretense” of humanitarian aid to enter into North Korea to use religion to attempt to overthrow the Kim regime.

The state-owned Korean Central News Agency said at the time that Lim was guilty of “[committing] anti-DPRK religious activities, [conducting] false propaganda among overseas Koreans, and [taking] active part in the operation of the U.S. and (a South Korean) conservative group to lure and abduct DPRK citizens […] in their programs for ‘aiding defectors from the North.'”

After his release, Pastor Lim thanked the Canadian government for its assistance, including National Security Adviser Daniel Jean, who visited North Korea to ask for his freedom.

“It’s a miracle for me to be here today,” the pastor said in his church. “I always knew Canada was a very warm and compassionate nation, but through my ordeal I really began to grasp that very deeply.”

Prior to his arrest, Lim had made more than 100 trips to North Korea to do humanitarian work, all without any problems.

When Lim finally arrived back to Canada, he said “it felt like coming home to family. It was like a dream.” He added that reuniting with his congregation and church was also overwhelming, especially meeting his granddaughter for the first time.

“I was deeply impressed by the reality of how precious family is,” he said.